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Gelatin Varieties and Types

Vegetarian and other types are alternatives to animal gelatin

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Gelatin

© 2007 Peggy Trowbridge Filippone

Gelatin Varieties and Types

Other forms of gelatin exist to meet the needs of those wishing alternatives to meat products for various reasons. Those of the Jewish faith may eat animal gelatin only if it is extracted from permitted animals which have undergone ritual slaughter and excludes some forms including those made from pigs and certain types of fish.

Isinglass is a type of gelatin extracted from the air bladders of certain fish, particularly sturgeon, but is rarely used these days.

Carrageen, also known as Irish moss, is a gelatinous thickening agent derived from seaweed which grows off the coast of Ireland. Irish moss is often used in making homebrews and meads.

Agar (also agar-agar, kanten and Japanese gelatin is a dried seaweed sold in blocks, powder and strands which is used as a setting agent. Agar has stronger setting properties than gelatin, so use less when substituting.

Pectin occurs naturally in fruits and vegetables and is used in the preparation of jams, jellies and preserves. Gelatin can also be extracted from fish bones.

More About Gelatin and Gelatin Recipes

Gelatin Cooking Tips
Gelatin Varieties and Types
Gelatin History
Gelatin Recipes
Gelatin Photo © 2007 Peggy Trowbridge Filippone, licensed to About.com, Inc.

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