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Fake Scallops and Scallop Types

Beware fake scallops

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scallops, fake, types, recipes, shellfish, seafood, receipts

Sea Scallops (large) and Bay (small) Scallops

© 2008 Peggy Trowbridge Filippone

Types of Scallops

The scallop is a bi-valve mollusk of the family Pectinidae and are related to clams, mussels, and oysters.

There are many varieties of scallop, ranging from the tiny, tender bay scallop to the larger, less tender deep sea scallop. The entire scallop within the shell is edible, much like its clam and oyster cousins, and none of it is wasted outside the United States. However, it is the adductor muscle which hinges the two shells that is most commonly sold and consumed by the general public in the US.

Fake Scallops

Some unscrupulous markets have been known to substitute stamped large deep sea scallops for the smaller, more delectable bay scallops. Worse yet, some have subsituted shark for scallops. Beware if the scallops are all of exactly uniform size and shape. This is an indication the producer may have cut out the scallops from larger, less tender deep sea scallops or even shark, much like one would use a cookie-cutter.

On the other hand, if you are so inclined, there are some honestly-labeled imitation scallop products, similar to the imitation crab and lobster sold by reputable seafood firms and grocery stores.

More about Scallops and Scallop Recipes:

Scallop Selection and Storage
Fake Scallops and Scallop Types
Scallop History
Scallop Recipes
Scallop Photo © 2008 Peggy Trowbridge Filippone, licensed to About.com, Inc.

Cookbooks

Big Book of Fish & Shellfish
Fish & Shellfish: The Definitive Cook's Companion
Rick Stein's Complete Seafood: A Step-by-step Reference
50 Chowders: One Pot Meals - Clam, Corn, & Beyond
More Cookbooks
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