1. Food

Discuss in my forum

Garlic History

American foodies snubbed garlic until the 1940's

By

garlic, recipes, vegetable, history, receipts

Garlic

© Peggy Trowbridge Filippone

Garlic History

The word garlic comes from Old English garleac, meaning "spear leek." Dating back over 6,000 years, it is native to Central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

Egyptians worshiped garlic and placed clay models of garlic bulbs in the tomb of Tutankhamen. Garlic was so highly-prized, it was even used as currency. Folklore holds that garlic repelled vampires, protected against the Evil Eye, and warded off jealous nymphs said to terrorize pregnant women and engaged maidens. And let us not forget to mention the alleged aphrodisiacal powers of garlic which have been extolled through the ages.

Surprisingly, garlic was frowned upon by foodie snobs in the United States until the first quarter of the twentieth century, being found almost exclusively in ethnic dishes in working-class neighborhoods. But, by 1940, America had embraced garlic, finally recognizing its value as not only a minor seasoning, but as a major ingredient in recipes.

Quaint diner slang of the 1920's referred to garlic as Bronx vanilla, halitosis, and Italian perfume. Today, Americans alone consume more than 250 million pounds of garlic annually.

More About Garlic:

Garlic Cooking Tips and Hints
Garlic Selection and Storage
What is garlic?
Why does garlic smell?
Garlic History
Garlic and Health
Garlic Recipes
Garlic Photo © 2007 Peggy Trowbridge Filippone, licensed to About.com, Inc.

Cookbooks

The Complete Garlic Lovers' Cookbook
Everything Tastes Better With Garlic
The Great Garlic Cookbook
Garlic, Garlic, Garlic
More Cookbooks

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.